Monthly Archives: February 2015

Traditional foods banned by Nourishing Traditions

The book Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig is worth reading by those of us who reject the current saturated-fat-must-be-evil nutritional orthodoxy.  However, part of its argument is that we should all be eating ‘traditional foods’ and then they ban the following traditional foods, some of which go back as far as we have food records:

  • tea
  • coffee
  • beer/wine
  • chocolate
  • distilled alcohol

Yes, these foods can be overeaten, but it seems likely that Fallon and Enig have banned these foods on the basis of very sketchy research because they already assumed they were unhealthy.

In fact, white flour has been consumed in Europe for centuries.  It also can be overeaten, and does not work for some people.  However, to claim that white flour except in tiny quantities is unhealthy for everyone seems to be inconsistent with their emphasis on ‘traditional foods.’

They also seem to be missing any thought about the foods a person’s ancestors ate.  Those of us descended mostly from northwestern European ancestors are probably better able to eat white flour in moderation than those from Asia, where white flour is a much more recent addition.  However, this is a topic far too large to be added to the end of a blog post on a related topic.

Shortcuts to carb counting I’ve started using

It’s been a while since I’ve posted, and I’ve found that as my little one with diabetes gets older and eats more carbs, I can be a little less careful about certain things.  The following are shortcuts I’ve been starting to use:

For normal homemade bread I just use a carb factor of .4.  I would not use this if raisins or more than a few tablespoons of sugar were added.

For cooked vegetables, I often just eyeball the number of tablespoons as I scoop them with a normal tablespoon.  They are low carb enough that this works.  I would not do this for corn or peas.